Trans Fats and Low Fat Diets

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Trans Fats are a form of unsaturated fat, but because of their different molecular arrangement they have a very different biological effect.  There is  no evidence of trans fats contributing to positive health and have been linked to several negative health effects.  These effects include diabetes and heart disease, and they can occur with a very small amount of consumption. (Derbyshire)  I personally avoid consuming any trans fats. Continue reading “Trans Fats and Low Fat Diets”

Cholesterol: Bacon and Eggs a Secret to Health?

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Cholesterol in the blood can be one of the best predictors for heart disease, especially if the ratio between high density lipoprotein (HDL(Good Cholesterol)) and low density lipoprotein (LDL(Bad cholesterol)) is considered.  Cholesterol is fat bound up in lipoproteins in order to make it soluble (Fats and Cholesterol). Continue reading “Cholesterol: Bacon and Eggs a Secret to Health?”

Omega 3’s: Fishy Fats

Omega 3 fatty acids have recently been touted as almost a universal cure all, and the solution to many of America’s problems with fats.  Omega 3’s are a polyunsaturated fat, however, I separated them from my previous post.  The majority of polyunsaturated fats that Americans consume are Omega 6, so I separated Omega 3s in order to truly consider their heath impacts.  Polyunsaturated fats are defined by where the first double bond is located, and that is where the difference between Omega 3 and Omega 6 comes from, where the double bond is located (American Dietetic Association 1599).  The current dietary recommendations of the Mayo Clinic, the ADA, and Willett, all state that increased consumption of Omega 3’s is important for health (American Dietetic Association 1599; Willett and Skerrett; Mayo Clinic Staff). Continue reading “Omega 3’s: Fishy Fats”